Berkeley hotels

California Voter’s Guide to the November 2022 Elections

K–Belmont measure

The measure would increase the transitional occupancy tax from 12% to 14%. The tax is paid by guests of the hotel, motel, or other short-term rental accommodation. The measure would provide an additional $600,000 a year to be used for general city services such as fixing potholes, repairing streets and sidewalks, maintaining 911 response times, meeting deadlines and budget for infrastructure projects, maintaining services for the elderly, and preserving the health and safety of public spaces. and clean. It requires a simple majority to pass.

Measure L – East of Palo Alto

The measure would increase the business tax for owners from 1.5% to 2.5% and remove the exemption for owners of five or fewer rental units. The tax cannot be passed on to tenants. The approximately $1.48 million generated each year would be used to fund affordable housing programs, provide rental support to tenants, and protect local residents from displacement and homelessness. It requires a simple majority to pass.

Measure M – Bayshore Elementary School District

The measure would renew the Bayshore Elementary School District plot tax of $96 per plot for eight years with exemptions for seniors and persons with disabilities and annual adjustments. It would raise about $160,000 a year to maintain competition in science, math, reading and writing; attract and retain teachers and integrate modern technology. It takes a 2/3 vote to pass.

N–Millbrae measure

The measure would increase the transitional occupancy tax from 12% to 14%, effective January 2023. The tax is paid by guests of hotels, motels or other short-term rental accommodation. The measure would provide an additional $1.5 million per year to be used for general city services, such as repairing potholes and streets, maintaining neighborhood/downtown police patrols, improving recreational programs/parks, attracting new businesses and improving disaster response. It requires a simple majority to pass.

Measure O – Brisbane

The measure would enact a new business license tax on hotels and other venues designed for guest overnight stays. The tax would be $2.50 per room for each day the room is rented, generating approximately $250,000 per year until terminated by voters. Revenues collected would be used to pay general municipal expenses. It requires a simple majority to pass.

Measure P – Redwood City

The measure would shorten the mayor’s term from two years to one year to allow more council members to serve as mayors during their time on city council. He would amend the Redwood Town Charter, the guiding document of town government, to enact this change. It requires a simple majority to pass.

Measure Q–Pacifica

The measure asks voters whether the city should amend its municipal code to prohibit the lighting, use, discharge or sale of all state-approved fireworks in the city. Currently, certain eligible organizations are permitted to sell state-approved fireworks between June 28 and July 4 each year, and the general public may use state-approved fireworks between June 28 June and July 5 each year. This is an advisory measure, which means that the result is not binding.

Measure R – La Honda-Pescadero Unified School District

The measure would allow the La Honda-Pescadero Unified School District to issue up to $15 million in bonds. To fund the bond, the district estimates an annual property tax of $0.06 per $100 of assessed value while the bonds are outstanding. The million dollars raised each year would be used to improve educational facilities to support an expanded curriculum, repair deteriorated infrastructure and upgrade school facilities in district schools. It takes 55% of the vote to pass.

Measure S – Redwood City School District

The measure would allow the Redwood City Elementary School District to issue up to $298 million in bonds. To fund the bond, the district estimates an annual property tax of $24 per $100,000 of assessed value while the bonds are outstanding. The $16 million raised each year would be used to improve local elementary and middle schools by repairing and upgrading STEM and arts classrooms; making safety/security improvements; upgrading of heating, cooling and electrical systems and construction of facilities. It takes 55% of the vote to pass.

Measure T – South San Francisco School District

The measure would allow the South San Francisco School District to issue up to $436 million in bonds. To fund the bond, the district estimates an annual property tax of $0.06 per $100 of assessed value while the bonds are outstanding. The $27 million raised each year would be used to upgrade school facilities, improve health and safety, equip schools with 21st century learning technologies and build affordable rental housing for teachers and staff. It takes 55% of the vote to pass.

U–Brisbane T measurement

The measure would enact a new municipal sales tax of 0.5%, bringing the total sales tax in the city to 9.875%. Revenues of approximately $2 million generated annually would be used to fund city services/facilities such as neighborhood police patrols, fire prevention services, urban wildfire protection, law enforcement/criminal investigations, pothole and street repairs, and parks and other city facilities. It requires a simple majority to pass.

Measure V – Menlo Park

The measure would prohibit City Council from rezoning or redesignating properties that have been zoned and designated for single-family homes as of April 15, 2022. Currently, all city land, including properties zoned and designated for single-family homes use, may be re-zoned and re-designated by City Council. It requires a simple majority to pass.

Measure W – Sequoia Union High School District

The measure would allow Sequoia Union High School District to issue up to $591.5 million in bonds. To fund the bond, the district estimates an annual property tax of $14 per $100,000 of assessed value while the bonds are outstanding. The $30.4 million raised each year would be used to repair and upgrade aging local high schools by fixing plumbing, heating, ventilation and electrical systems, as well as upgrading STEM classrooms, skilled trades and arts. It takes 55% of the vote to pass.

Measure X – Burlingame

The measure would increase existing tax rates on business licenses and impose a new business license tax on commercial cannabis businesses. Currently, all businesses pay the same $100 annual business license fee. The measure would create a three-tier rate based on a company’s annual gross receipts. Cannabis businesses would pay a new tax of 5% of annual gross receipts. The measure would generate about $2.5 million a year and be used for repairing streets and sidewalks, improving crime prevention, burying power lines, and for other general government uses. It requires a simple majority to pass.

Measure Y–Pacifica

The measure would establish a municipal sales tax of 0.5%. The approximately $2.6 million generated each year would be for general city services such as police maintenance, firefighters, 9-1-1 emergency medical response; keep pollution/litter off beaches; attracting and retaining business; street paving; maintenance of storm drains and prevention of coastal erosion. It requires a simple majority to pass.

Z-Measurement – ​​Redwood City

The measure would amend the City of Redwood Charter, the guiding document of city government, to reflect current practices in the city. This would align the date of municipal elections with the statewide general election, specify that newly elected members of the city council would take office at the first regular council meeting after results are certified and winners declared. , and would clarify that council members are instead elected by district. of at-large. It requires a simple majority to pass.

Measure AA – South San Francisco

The measure asks voters to allow the city to develop, build or acquire low-income housing up to 1% of the total number of existing housing units in the city. The measure would be in effect for 8 years, with one-year unused units being carried over each year. The California constitution requires a city’s voters to grant their approval before any federal, state, or local public entity develops low-cost housing projects. It requires a simple majority to pass.

BB measurement – ​​San Bruno

The measure would enact term limits for city council members and the mayor to no more than 12 consecutive years. This would mean that no council member could serve more than 3 consecutive terms of 4 years each, and no mayor could serve more than 6 consecutive terms of 2 years each. The measure does not prohibit someone from serving more than 12 years, as long as those years are not consecutive. It requires a simple majority to pass.

DC measurement – ​​San Mateo

The measure would increase the city’s current transfer tax on sales of properties of $10 million or more from 0.5% to 1.5%. The real estate transfer tax is paid by the buyer and the seller of a property. It would generate approximately $4.8 million annually for general city services such as street repair, parks and recreation, fire protection, emergency response, crime prevention and improving intersections, sidewalks and cycle paths for safety and reducing traffic congestion. It requires a simple majority to pass.

Measure DD – South San Francisco

The measure would impose an annual tax of $2.50 per square foot on parcels of land in south San Francisco that are developed and used as commercial office parcels and are 25,000 square feet or more. The tax would generate about $55.9 million a year, with no automatic expiration date, to fund learning and child care for families living or working within the boundaries of the South San Francisco Unified School District. It requires a simple majority to pass.